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Group appeals for $55m to provide emergency education in Northeast Nigeria

The Education in Emergency Working Group is appealing for the sum of $55 million to provide emergency education to 3.1 million conflict-affected children in the north-east, Nigeria.

The Emergency partners said so far this year, only $3.3 million, an amount described as a mere 6 per cent of the total needed has been provided.

The United Nation, UN, which is among the group, made these known in a statement made available to Journalists in Abuja on the occasion of the first International Day for Protection of Education.

The UN called for increased funding, saying ”’it will go a long way in mitigating the effects of prolonged school closures on learners, especially vulnerable children, including girls and others living with disabilities.”

It further disclosed that more than three million children in the conflict-affected states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe in North-east Nigeria are in need of education-in-emergency support.

With school reopening plans underway in many states, in North-east Nigeria, education in emergency partners are appealing for $55 million USD to provide emergency education to 3.1 conflict-affected children this year. So far this year, only $3.3 million USD, a mere 6 per cent of the total needed, has been received so far… More than three million children in the conflict-affected states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe in north-east Nigeria are in need of education-in-emergency support.  

The UN stated that some 4.2 million children in the north-east are at risk of missing out on education.

According to the UN, “to the Covid-19 pandemic is an opportunity to build a resilient education system, invest in human capital and strengthen communities who act as first responders in the event of attacks on schools.

It added that to deliver for children in Nigeria, education must remain on top of the public agenda while government should boost efforts to translate its vision for education into real change for children, especially the most vulnerable and disadvantaged learners.

 

 

Source: Voice of Nigeria